Why Equipment Cost is Not The Most Important Factor When Buying a New Machine

So Many of us focus on the one thing that is right in front of us when purchasing a new commercial washer. The PRICE! We are forgetting the most important thing when making this ever important decision. Cost of ownership of that machine at 5 years, 10 years and 15 years. New equipment isn’t just going to last for the first 5 years when many large repairs are covered under warranty. You will inevitably have to repair your new machine in its lifetime. So many times we overlook that cost into our decision. So many brands are competitive on initial purchase price of machines. But big names like Unimac and Speed Queen are set to make huge returns on repairs. Cost of parts for these machines has gotten out of control over the last decade. Many parts for the Unimac machines cost two to four times as much as there competitors. For example a Unimac controller is $3704.70, this same part with a B&C or Fagor washer which has the same features or more costs one third the price. No days manufacturers all source similar parts from the few manufacturers out there. So don’t be fooled into purchasing a machine that will charge you two to four times as much for the same part. Call us today to see why we sell the brands we do. Honest and fair pricing upfront and in the future. See the chart below to compare many parts on a Unimac to our Fagor and B&C machines.

Wash IQ

1-844-492-7447

 

UNIMAC VS B&C VS FAGOR

 

Unimac Part Unimac Price B&C Part B&C Price Fagor Part Fagor Price
F100P3- KIT,CNTRL WX DRV TERMINATOR

Display Board

 

$3,704.70 370-155 Control, FM7 Display

 

$1,140.85 12010836 Touchscreen 8.4

 

 

$1,212.08
F8577201-KIT,DRAIN VALVE 240V 3 RH

 

 

$329.05 380-026 VALVE,DRAIN WITH OVERFLOW 24V,50/60HZ 3 INCH

 

 

$133.64 12024404 Drain Valve

 

$444.70
F8322801P-VALVE, 1/2″ (BRASS 240/60

 

 

$173.75 380-071 VALVE,WATER,1-WAY,3/4INCH,24VAC,50/60HZ

 

$90.60 12025162 Water Valve 230V $39.60
F8204801P-

ASSY,DRIVE(5HP 240VAC), PKG

 

 

$1,294.95 370-034 Inverter, Delta, 200V, 1phase

 

 

 

$1,018.44 12134048

Inverter Delta

$1,629.54
F83220501-Complete Door lock Assembly $223.85 600-108 Complete Door Lock Assembly

 

$379.51 12119770 Complete Door Lock $263.70
F8335201P Motor 230/460V 5HP $1758.55 220-002 Motor 5HP 12047170 Motor 230V AC 3 50hz 2,20KW $739.38 5HP 12047170 Motor 230V AC 3 50hz 2,20KW

 

$832.22

4 Common Laundry Problems and How You Can Fix Them

It may not be everyone’s favorite activity, but doing laundry is an inevitable part of life, especially in the hospitality industry and other industrial settings where large quantities of linens, sheets, and other types of clothing need to be washed regularly and professionally.

While the concept of washing seems pretty straightforward, it’s not uncommon to encounter these hiccups along the way that could easily make your business suffer if you don’t address it properly.

 

The towels come out grey after drying

It’s not uncommon for some clothes, linens, or towels to come out gray after washing. But sometimes, towels can also come out grey after drying, which is caused by occasional over-drying.

To solve this problem, professional drying solutions suggests that every towel tumbler should be fitted with an automatic terminator that will prevent over-drying by stopping the process when there’s only about 2% of moisture left in the textile.

This accessory is usually sold as an energy saver, but it’s also just as helpful in preventing towels, linens, and sheets from turning grey after drying.

 

You see detergent residues on clothes

No one wants to wear clothes that smell of detergent because they are not only pretty strong for the nose but also harsh on the skin, which might cause allergies. But if you see detergent residues on clothes and even sheets, it could be because your powdered detergent isn’t dissolving properly.

To fix this problem, use liquid detergent if you’re doing cold-water cycles because the powder doesn’t dissolve as much in cold water. Also, keep your loads below the maximum level to make sure that your clothes can spin properly.

You can also try filling the washer with water first and adding the detergent before putting the clothes to give it time to dissolve properly.

 

Clothes and sheets become yellow

Yellowing has been a longtime problem in commercial settings and it’s usually caused by the incorrect finishing of textiles after the manufacturing process. This is why it’s best to rinse new textiles with just warm water before putting them in the washing machine because the heat will usually cause the discoloration if the cloth was left with an alkaline surface.

It’s also important to use a detergent booster or increase the amount of detergent on your next wash to avoid any further discoloration.

 

There are small holes in sheets and clothes

Finally, when you’re offering professional laundry solutions, you can’t afford to cause any damages to the sheets, textiles, towels, and clothes that you’re washing. But sometimes, small holes may appear in some fabrics, which are caused by incorrect membrane press settings.

The membrane-press is an important tool in speeding up the washing and drying process because it helps to minimize the moisture content in fabrics after every rinse. But if not done right, some fabrics won’t be able to handle the full pressure of the membrane-press causing small holes in them. To avoid this, make sure that you don’t overuse the membrane-press settings, especially when washing old fabrics.


Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

Why An Industrial Washing Machine Is Better?

A regular washing machine is what most homeowners have in their households. While a regular washing machine is enough to cover the weekly laundry, industrial washer offers numerous advantages that you will appreciate in the long run.

  • Bigger capacity – industrial washing machine can handle bigger and larger loads. Bigger load means extra productivity.
  • Durability – an industrial washer is designed for rigorous washing. It can handle the demands of regular use.
  • Cost-efficient – while a regular washing machine can handle the regular family laundry, constant use will cause wear and tear which will leave you with no choice but to purchase a new one. On the other hand, industrial washing machines are designed to withstand the rigors of regular use.
  • Time-efficient – industrial washer has a larger cylinder size compared to a regular home washing machine. Loads of laundry can be dried in as quickly as 30 minutes in an industrial washing machine.

Getting an industrial washing machine is quite expensive, but the life of the machine and the benefits it can give you outweighs the cost.

An industrial washer may be expensive at first, but the life of the machine saves you from the stress of going through the hassle of getting your regular washing machine repaired or replaced.


Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

When to Use Hand Sanitizer

Hand washing with soap and water is still one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of harmful germs and bacteria. Even before the COVID19 pandemic, hand washing has been highly encouraged by medical and health professionals.

But in the absence of soap and water, using at least 60% alcohol-based sanitizer can reduce the risk of getting sick and spreading germs.

The use of hand sanitizer is easy, convenient, and almost always readily available. In some public places like bus and train stations, public restrooms, fast food chains, and others have strategically placed sanitizer dispensers for public use.

While alcohol-based sanitizer can kill microbes, it is not entirely effective on all germs and other harmful substances on your hands.

Since hand sanitizer does not kill all types of germs and remove harmful chemicals, when do we need to use hand sanitizer?

Knowing which method to use in any given circumstance will give you the best chance of preventing the spread of germs or bacteria. Most of all, it cuts down the chance of getting sick.

  • When in hospitals – hospitals deploy hand sanitizers in sanitizer dispensers in all corners. Always take advantage of the free use of alcohol-based sanitizer when visiting a friend or a loved one in the hospital. Studies show that hand sanitizers work well in hospital settings; for hands come in contact with germs only not with grease.
  • When in nursing homes – sanitize your hands with at least 60% to 95% alcohol-based sanitizers before and after visiting a friend or loved one in nursing homes. Nursing homes provide free access to hand sanitizers for hygienic purposes.
  • When in public places – there are moments when soap and water are not available like when you are in the park or out driving, the use of alcohol-based sanitizer can reduce the microbes in the hands. Always use at least 60% to 95% alcohol-based sanitizer as it is more effective in killing germs.
  • When you cannot wash with soap and water – always carry a hand sanitizer with you.  So when public sanitizer dispensers with 60% to 95% alcohol-based sanitizer are not available, you always have enough to temporarily cleanse your hands.
  • When you want added protection – you can rub a hand sanitizer all over your hands after washing with soap and water for extra protection.

Use hand sanitizers properly; refer to the manufacturer’s advice for the recommended amount. Then, rub alcohol based on your entire hands, gaps between your fingers, and on the back of your hands. Lastly, only stop rubbing when your skin is dry.

Remember not to use hand sanitizer when your hands are visibly greasy and dirty. Do not use hand sanitizer if you have touched harmful chemicals like heavy metals or pesticides.

Also, do not use hand sanitizer when you have been exposed to high infectious agents like if you are with a person who is sick with Clostridium difficile.

Do not use hand sanitizer because it is convenient. Although sanitizer dispensers are readily available in public places, hand washing is still the most effective way to combat the spread of diseases and germs.


Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

Different Types of Chemicals Used in Laundry

Doing laundry is an important part of our house chores. Hotels, restaurants, and resorts have to do laundry in bulk. From sheets, towels, table covers and napkins, and other linens need to be clean and smelling fresh. But do you have any idea what are the different laundry chemicals used to keep these piles of sheets and textiles crisp, fresh, and stain-free?

Laundry chemicals include pre-spotters, detergents, detergent boosters, neutralizers, bleaches, de-stainers, and fabric softeners. Take a look at the descriptions of each laundry aid to know which solution works best for your specific laundry needs.

  • Pre-spotters come in liquid formulation which is used to remove oil, make-up, grease, dirt, and other tough stains. Pre-spotters eliminate stubborn dirt or stains before washing.
  • Detergents are the main laundry cleaning agents to get rid of dust, dirt, oil, and, stains which are made of synthetic surfactant, chelating agents, enzymes, fragrances, and optical brighteners.

Detergents are available in three (3) forms: solid, liquid, and powder. Liquid detergent works well in all water temperatures. On the other hand, powder detergent works best with warm water to dissolve.

  • Detergent boosters are used together with laundry detergents to improve stain removal. The uses of these boosters also enhance the cleaning performance of laundry detergent at the same time conditioning the water for optimal results.
  • Neutralizers remove residual alkali and mineral deposits in the water. Neutralizers’ also known as souring agents are responsible for controlling the PH of the linen to cut down possible skin irritation. By removing the high mineral deposits in the water, neutralizers prevent the linen from turning yellowish or grayish.
  • Bleaches are laundry cleaning aids used to remove stubborn stains not removed during the wash cycle, brighten and whiten fabrics. Laundry chemicals like bleaches or de-stainers turn the soil into soluble particles that are then eliminated by laundry detergents. Laundry bleaches are available in two types: chlorine and oxygen.

Chlorine bleach is primarily used for white linens as a brightening agent. It can also be used to disinfect fabrics while oxygen bleach is or commonly known as “color safe” bleach is gentle and safe for use on almost all washable fabrics.

  • Fabric softeners are added to the final rinse to make the fabrics fluffier and softer. Fabric softeners reduce the wrinkles on fabrics, thus making ironing easier and faster.
  • Enzyme presoaks are for heavily stained or soiled fabrics. Presoaks are used for soaking linens before washing. Also, when added to wash water, presoaks enhance the cleaning performance of laundry detergents.
  • Starches and fabric finishes these laundry aids are used in the final rise to make the fabrics more soil resistant.

Laundry chemicals and solutions contribute to the overall performance of laundry detergents. These laundry aids and products have precise benefits and advantages to achieve effective laundry washing and cleaning.

For optimal results, use laundry products that suit your fabric needs, wash methods, and washing equipment. With so many products available in the market, it is important to know what products are meant for your needs.


Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

How the Pump Works on Soap Dispensers

Pumps are used in different applications and usually found in household items for everyday usage. It is commonly used in sprayers and dispensers like soap dispensers. But how do pump dispenser pump works? How does it pump the liquid upwards?

The soap dispensers rely on the bottle and the air suction to draw the fluid upwards. The pump is attached to a long flexible plastic tube that runs through the bottom of the bottle. Above the dip is a valve that prevents the liquid from going back down to the tube.

The pump works by applying pressure on to the pump mechanism and then creates a suction effect which draws the liquid upwards the tube. Once you release the pump head, the valve returns to its sealing position to block the liquid from flowing back to the bottle.

A soap dispenser pump is composed of several components:

  • The actuator is the top of the pump pressed to dispense the liquid soap.
  • The closure is the part of the pump that is attached to the bottleneck.
  • The outer gasket is made of plastic or rubber that prevents the liquid soap from leaking.
  • A dip tube is a flexible tube that extends from the housing to the bottom of the container.
  • Housing is the main component of the soap dispenser that draws fluid to the actuator.

Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

The FDA and Hand Sanitizers

With COVID19 greatly causing health scares across the globe, the demand for hand sanitizers and sanitizing products has increased. As production increases to meet the needs, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has seen hand sanitizers contaminated with methanol.

Methanol also known as wood alcohol is a type of alcohol used to create solvents and fuels. Methanol is a colorless liquid, with an odor similar to that of ethanol.

It is flammable and toxic when ingested or absorbed through the skin. Adverse effects of methanol include hospitalizations, blindness, and sometimes even death, thus, making it an unacceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers.

The Food and Drug Administration is currently conducting investigations on certain hand sanitizer products with methanol. This is to prevent consumers from buying these brands; to prevent toxic effects.

Consumers and hand sanitizer users that have been exposed to contaminated methanol products and are experiencing nausea, headache, vomiting, and blurred vision. It is then imperative for you to seek immediate medical care or treatment for the reversal of methanol toxic effects. 

Seeking speedy treatment can prevent serious effects such as blindness, coma, seizure, and damage to the nervous system. Consumers and users exposed to methanol are at risk, but children and adults who accidentally ingest the product are more at risk.

The FDA remains vigilant for hand sanitizing products containing methanol and any quality issues. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is not only concerned about products contaminated with methanol but other concerns like:

  • Hand sanitizing products not containing a sufficient amount of isopropyl alcohol or ethyl alcohol.
  • Hand sanitizer products marketed as “FDA approved” when there are no hand sanitizers approved by the agency.
  • Sanitizing products containing misleading information and claims that products contain the spread of COVID19 and other diseases.
  • Sanitizing products packaged to appear like miniature drinks or enticing enough for children to think this can be consumed, or for them to accidentally drink or ingest these products. Ingesting even a small portion of hand sanitizer can be deadly for children.
  • Hand sanitizing products with or without methanol must be placed beyond a child’s reach. Consumers must not drink any of these products.

While the need to constantly clean and sanitize our hands is necessary especially because of COVID19, it is advisable to read the back label of the product before purchasing it. It is recommended to use alcohol-based sanitizers with at least 70% ethanol or ethyl alcohol.

In the absence of hand sanitizers with 70% ethanol, stick to the basic hand washing. Wash your hands at least 20 seconds with clean water and soap. Do these often even while at home especially before and after eating, after using the bathroom, after coughing, sneezing, or even after blowing your nose.

Hand washing is also recommended before and after cooking, playing with or feeding pets, after a diaper change, handling garbage, before and after dressing a wound, and when your hands look dirty.


Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

Industrial Dryer Design

Industrial dryers are among the most important pieces of equipment in the industrial processing industry to eliminate water and moisture from the materials. Industrial dyers are used for different applications like in pharmaceuticals, textile, packaging industry, ceramics, food processing, paper drying, and more.

Industrial dryers range in size from small batch units to large conveyor types and specifications suitable for the industry they serve.

Industrial dryer design must be focused on maintaining the physical, chemical, or biological aspects of the material that is being processed, drying uniformity, energy efficiency, and process control. Some can even be amended in different industrial applications.

Developments in industrial dryer design allow continued production of the best results in the processed materials. These developments overcome the drying challenges for time and energy efficiency advances.

Industrial drying solutions for different applications

  • Laboratory scale industrial dyers are suitable for laboratory experiments or small productions. Lab-scale dryers are for pre-heating, processing of chemical, and high-temperature processing.
  • Batch type industrial dyers are built with solidness and basic drying function. The dyer chambers are designed to accomplish uniform warming and fitting doors for loading and unloading of materials to be dried. Rotary drying, drum drying, and tray drying are the typical applications of batch scale dyers.
  • Continuous types of dryers are best suited for continuous processes. These do not require manual feeding. Conveyor industrial dryers carefully monitor and control the temperature. Conveyors gently dry materials by controlling the conditions in each zone. In each zone, humidity, temperature, and airflow can be adjusted to manage the rate of drying. Conveyor dryers are typically used in paper drying, textile drying, ceramic industries, packaging industries, and pharmaceutical application.

Industrial dryers’ maintenance

Preventive maintenance is an essential aspect of dryer operation. Keeping an industrial dryer in top shape is an utmost priority. Keeping the equipment in working condition is a must for it to function efficiently and maintain high reliability. Regular use of an industrial dryer can lead to wear and tear or potential outage which can cause production and profit loss.

A regular check-up and maintenance must be established. Regular inspections must be done by a certified and qualified engineering expert to inspect and foresee mechanical and systemic failure. Preventive maintenance eliminates or at least reduces downtime.

Since drying is a key process in the majority of industrial processes, it should be carefully designed to last for long term use.

From the design, material used, energy consumption, and ease of use, these must be properly incorporated without affecting the functionality, chemical, and physical property of the material.

Finding a Manufacturer

After the design and function features, also consider going for an industrial dryer manufacturer with proven customer support. Always go for a reputable manufacturer that can provide long term customer and product support.

Pick an industrial dryer manufacturer that can promptly arrange parts and services, product pieces of training for operators and staff. Look for a manufacturer with years of experience in industrial processing. 

Take advantage of the advanced features and latest designs in the industrial dryer and make sure it is the ideal match for your product.


Wash IQ offers laundry machine chemicals, and a variety of professional laundry solutions nationwide and to the following counties: Alameda County, Alpine County, Amador County, Butte County, Calaveras County, Colusa County, Contra Costa County, Del Norte County, El Dorado County, Fresno County, Glenn County, Humboldt County, Imperial County, Inyo County, Kern County, Kings County, Lake County, Lassen County, Los Angeles County, Madera County, Marin County, Mariposa County, Mendocino County, Merced County, Modoc County, Mono County, Monterey County, Napa County, Nevada County, Orange County, Placer County, Plumas County, Riverside County, Sacramento County, San Benito County, San Bernardino County, San Diego County, City and County of San Francisco, San Joaquin County, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Barbara County, Santa Clara County, Santa Cruz County, Shasta County, Sierra County, Siskiyou County, Solano County, Sonoma County, Stanislaus County, Sutter County, Tehama County, Trinity County, Tulare County, Tuolumne County, Ventura County, Yolo County, Yuba County

SHOULD YOU ADD DRY-CLEANING SERVICE TO YOUR LAUNDROMAT?

Adding drop-off dry-cleaning to your existing laundromat can be an alluring prospect for business owners but adding it to your menu of services doesn’t guarantee incremental profits or success.

Still, with this major decision on the table, Wash IQ is here to help by offering the following points to ensure you have put in due diligence before adding a service that could lead to loss instead of profits. (Keep in mind, these points are under the assumption you’ll be outsourcing the work due to physical constraints.) There are a handful of things that you ought to consider before taking the plunge and spending your business’s money on setting up dry-cleaning for your customers. Start by asking yourself these questions:

Is your self-service laundromat in a dry-cleaning area?

This is pretty much asking whether or not you are going to be able to pull in a customer base that makes adding the service worth the effort. Though it might not seem like it at first, this is likely the most difficult question you are going to have to figure out. This is because the answer will require you take a look at the socioeconomic details of your laundromat’s surrounding area.

You see, if your laundromat is very popular, that might mean that the area is too blue collar to have a customer base that needs dry cleaning – since it’s a service most often used by a white-collar class. However, just because your self-service laundry is getting good business doesn’t mean that there’s not a market for dry cleaning in the neighborhood, and you should take into consideration nearby apartment complexes and office buildings as well as look into census data for the zip code. There might actually be a hidden neighborhood of wealth near you.

Do you have or know of a reliable wholesale dry-cleaner?

If you have determined that your area is ripe for offering dry cleaning, you will then have to find someone to actually do the work for you. Preferably, the business you contract will be nearby and offer wholesale prices. Nonetheless, you can’t make the decision on price alone as the dry cleaner’s reliability is paramount in making sure your business doesn’t suffer. If the dry cleaner loses or damages garments, your customers won’t care that the service was outsourced – they’ll be looking to you to provide a solution (or compensation).

Does your laundry have enough space to hang all the dry-cleaning business you expect?

This is probably the least cumbersome thing you need to think about, but that doesn’t mean it’s any less important. Can your property support multiple hanger racks filled with clothes? Would you be willing to remove a coin-operated machine or two to make the space if needed?

Don’t forget that you’ll need a few employees.

One thing people seem to miscalculate when adding dry cleaning service is that they’ll need multiple employees to handle accepting and returning customers’ clothes. Sure, most laundry owners know they’ll need staff, but they end up budgeting for only one employee. Unless your self-service location is open only seven or eight hours a day, you’ll need more than one employee to handle the hours. Hiring (at least) three employees allows for allows for shift changes, some scheduling flexibility and days off.

Want to learn more about commercial laundry machines or starting your own laundry business? Our professionals at Wash IQ are ready and glad to help. To get a FREE laundry analysis call us at (844) 4WASHIQ

WHY A COMPLETELY NEW COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY SYSTEM IS OFTEN YOUR BEST BET

Whether you’re moving, opening a new location or have a few too many machines that keep breaking down no matter how many repairs are done sometimes your commercial washer or dryer just needs to be replaced. The question then becomes, should you buy a brand-new machine, or go with a used one. If you’re simply switching locations, wouldn’t it be more cost effective to just bring your current machines with you?

How do you know when it’s time to purchase a new system? Truth is, sometimes new really is better. Here are five advantages of buying a new system in place of lugging around your old machines or continually repairing them:

  1. New machines are more energy efficient. While it may be quite a large up-front cost to completely replace a whole system, the amount you’ll save in running energy-efficient equipment (instead of older models) will pay for the new equipment soon enough. Not only will you save on your energy bill, but also on your water bill, since many new commercial washer machines tend to use less water to get the job done as well.
  2. New machines can potentially mean more profit. Aside from saving you money down the line, some new commercial washers and dryers can actually help you make additional money. You’ll find that some include built-in upcharge features. These allow you to charge more for loads that use hot water or longer cycles. You can talk to your representative at Wash IQ for more information on these kinds of features.
  3. Looks matter. As superficial as it may sound, newer equipment just looks better. If you’re moving locations, want to open a new location or just want to bring in new customers – attractive machinery will attract people. New machines are often bigger – or at least have bigger doors – and have a better curb appeal. Even if you do your best to keep your current machines running smoothly and clean them out regularly, there’s something about new washers and dryers that can’t be imitated.
  4. It’s less stressful to do it all in one go. Instead of replacing units one by one and keeping track of what needs repairs when, it’s actually less stress to gut the entire system and start from scratch. Plus, sometimes it’s easier to get financing when you have a plan that includes a whole system, instead of taking out micro-loans for individual costly repairs or replacements as they come up.
  5. New equipment will last longer. If you’re planning on staying in business for a while (and we’re betting you are) it’s important to invest in equipment that will be around for the long haul. Even if you’ve kept your current laundry equipment in the best shape, if it’s already been running for 10 years, it’s probably going to last at least 10 years less than what a new system will.

If you think it’s time to invest in a new commercial washer and dryer system or have a few questions in regards to the best options, give Wash IQ a call at (844) 4WASHIQ and we’ll give you a FREE estimate and work with you on creating the best plan for your business and budget.